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BRAINIACS

Figure 1: Methodological approach of the BRAINIACS project: closely linking experiments, modeling, and simulation.

Brain tissue is not only one of the most important but also the most complex and compliant tissues in the human body. While long underestimated, increasing evidence confirms that mechanics plays a critical role in modulating brain function and dysfunction. The Emmy-Noether research group BRAINIACS – BRAIn mechaNIcs ACross Scales – aims to establish novel computational tools based on nonlinear continuum mechanics that can facilitate early diagnostics of neurological diseases and advance modern treatment strategies. We bridge the scales from known biological processes on the cellular scale to macroscopic pathologies apparent through modern imaging techniques.
To achieve this goal, our group combines experimental and microstructural analyses with continuum scale modeling and simulation. Performing experiments hand in hand with modeling and simulation allows us to continually optimize both experimental and numerical procedures. Through the simultaneous investigation of mechanics and microstructure, we aim to not only understand the regional variations in brain structure and function, but also to quantify the adaptation of cells to changes in their mechanical environment.
Solved within a finite element framework, those models will help us to foresee the behavior of brain tissue under physiological and pathological conditions, and to simulate progression of disease or mechanically-induced loss of brain function.

On December 13, we had our 2nd BRAINIACS meeting and Christmas party. It was a great platform to practice student seminar presentations, and to exchange our newest findings, challenges, and perspectives in a warm Christmassy atmosphere. Thanks to everyone for being such a great team and for your g...

End of November Alina Weizel from the University of Rostock, who is working on modeling the electrical and mechanical stimulation of hyaline cartilage, visited our lab. It is an exciting collaboration, which allows us to apply our holistic research approach, where we closely combine experiments, mod...

From 18th until 21st of November we visited the Institute of Biomechanics at Graz University of Technology led by Prof. Gerhard A. Holzapfel. The PhD student David Böhringer within the EFI project "TissueBiomech" hast started to test collagen-based hydrogels under multiple loading conditions using...

From the 5th until the 6th of November the Annual Meeting of the GAMM Activity Group 'Computational Biomechanics' was held at the University of Stuttgart. The aim of this consortium is to bring together researchers in the field, to share ideas, join forces, and advance international visibility and r...